Volkswagen Unveils Europe Bound T-Roc CUV

Volkswagen has always been known for its diverse segment portfolio, but a noticeable void  existed in the compact CUV segment. The German auto giant has solved this problem with the unveiling of the 2018 T-Roc CUV.

 

Slotted just below the Tiguan, the T-Roc is a curious mixture of style, muscle, and dare we say it unconventionality. The latter item really shows when you select one of its three trim levels ( Yorkville, Style, and Sport) with the Style trim living up to its name by offering buyers three different roof colors as well as four different coordinating interior colors.

Look for this particular trim to appeal to young urbanites that want a high dose of style in their small CUV purchase. Regardless of which trim is selected the T-Roc amps up its bold credentials in other ways. The wheel arches are pumped up with the rear fascia and haunches also drawing stares thanks to their bold lines. The nose and roof shapes are clearly derived from the T-Roc two door crossover concept which is a good thing since it was one of our favorite concepts from 2014.

The interior is also a bold youthful environment with sharp geometric shapes and squared off elements that further enhance its ruggedness. As a bonus neither the Tiguan nor the Atlas boast nearly the sheer levels of color that the T-Roc possesses which is a nice change of pace from the dark cabins that define many of its current models.

The T-Roc also puts technology at the forefront thanks to its standard 6.5 inch infotainment system which can be swapped out for a bigger 8-inch unit. Volkswagen’s familiar Digital Cockpit system is also available as an option, and it is nice to see this nifty piece of technology finally begin to trickle down to some of the company’s more mainstream models.

Performance for the T-Roc comes from six different engines that cover both the gasoline and diesel sides of the spectrum while also producing between 115 and 190 horsepower. The 190 horsepower engines are only available with all-wheel drive and a 7 speed dual clutch automatic. Meanwhile, the other engines are available with front wheel drive and can be equipped with both a manual transmission and front wheel drive.

Currently, Volkswagen has no plans to bring the T-Roc to the U.S. which is a baffling decision given the high demand for crossovers in our country. Volkswagen even admitted that fact in a prior press release saying that “Crossovers are the next big thing.” In addition, Volkswagen also has room in its U.S. lineup for the T-Roc thanks to the Tiguan growing in size as well as its stylish looks which would allow it to compete with rivals like the Kia Soul, Toyota C-HR, as well as the Nissan Juke. Lastly, its MQB roots would make any conversion to U.S. specifications relatively easy.

If the T-Roc does eventually make its way across the pond, look for it to only offer the 150 and 190 horsepower engines, and have the dual clutch automatic as the sole transmission choice, due to the equally steep decline in demand for manual transmissions especially in the crossover segment.